Macropods a Many

Plunkett has a good diversity of macropods (Wallabies and Kangaroos) considering it’s a fairly small park close to Brisbane.

There are four common species in the park. They include the eastern grey kangaroo, whiptail wallaby (or pretty face wallaby), red-neck wallaby and swamp wallaby. There is also potential that there could be rufous bettongs in the Cooingee Range section of the Plunkett Regional Park.

Eastern Grey Kangaroo

Eastern Grey Kangaroo

Red-necked Wallaby

Red-necked Wallaby

All five species have different habitat requirements which indicates that the Plunkett area has good diversity in habitat to cater for these macropod species individual requirements.

Eastern grey kangaroos prefer grassy open country which is bountiful adjacent to the western side of the park.

Whiptail wallabies also like grassy open country but have a preference for hilly terrain with more wooded areas for cover.

Swamp wallabies prefer heathy and shrubby understory where they can hide and remain unnoticed and a large part of their diet is made up of shrubby vegetation as opposed to grasses. They also like rocky areas.

The red-necked wallaby likes a combination of both shrubby and open country and are usually seen in early morning or late afternoon chewing on better quality grasses in open grassy paddocks.

Bettongs like quiet areas with open grassy woodland with plenty of long grass to hide in. Foxes are their number one predator.

Rufous Bettong

Rufous Bettong

Out of these five species the red-necked wallaby and the swamp wallaby are the most resilient to development. They tend to have smaller home ranges and can cope with some of the changes that surrounding urban development can bring. They also seem to be able to tolerate a high amount of disturbance by park visitors (walkers, horse riders, mountain bikers).

Daisy Hill Conservation Park has fairly high numbers of both these species and it also has extremely high visitation and this visitation seems to have little to no effect on these populations ability to sustain themselves. Vehicle hits and dog attacks are the biggest threats to these species.

Grey kangaroos and whiptail wallabies need larger territories and tend to be adversely affected by development and wild dog attacks.

Swamp Wallaby

Swamp Wallaby

Whiptail Wallaby

Whiptail Wallaby

 

 

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